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Australian Sky & Telescope

November - December 2020
Magazine

Australian Sky & Telescope is a world-class magazine about the science and hobby of astronomy. Combining the formidable worldwide resources of its venerable parent magazine with the talents of the best science writers and photographers in Australia, Australian Sky & Telescope is

Astronomy – not a nerdy pursuit

AUSTRALIAN SKY & TELESCOPE

No signs of life in Vela…

.. but signs of life on Venus?

Jupiter might have 600 moons

Astronomers find SN 1987A’s neutron star

Close encounters in the Milky Way’s bulge

Astronomy in transit • The Sun-centred Solar System led to accurate planetary predictions.

The David Malin Awards 2020 • Winning images from Australia’s major astrophoto competition.

To touch the SUN • NASA’s Parker Solar Probe is on a record-breaking journey to study our nearest star.

TO THE SUN, VIA VENUS

NEW PRODUCT SHOWCASE

The Radio Sky • Astronomers have invented a variety of novel approaches to observe the longest wavelengths of the electromagnetic spectrum.

LONG WAVES AND LONGER WAVES

Star Clocks • Measurements of stellar rotation give astronomers insight into stars’ ages. But they’ve also unearthed a mystery.

How a Star Slows Down

The wanderer

USING THE STAR CHART

Shine on with firsts and bests • Come get your share of the November night sky.

Giants stride the sky • The Solar System’s two largest planets are unmissable in the west sky after sunset.

SKY PHENOMENA

Sparks from Leo & Taurus

LUNAR PHENOMENA

Best for binoculars • Comet C/2020 M3 (ATLAS) is well placed for southern observers, and might reach magnitude 9.

An opposite attraction • Far from the Galactic centre, T Tauri is the star of the show.

CELESTIAL CALENDAR

NOVEMBER’S LUNAR ECLIPSE • Watch the Moon slip through Earth’s faint outer shadow.

The changing face of Mars • The Red Planet’s shifting sands bring changes to the Martian landscape.

Become a planetary pro • Innovative use of accessories can enhance your observing experience.

The lost discoveries of E.E Barnard • The famed American astronomer was an avid observer yet didn’t publish many of his findings — now, his unreported discoveries are coming to light.

BARNARD’S COMET DISCOVERIES AND ASSOCIATED FINDS

My virtual comet sighting • There’s nothing like being there, but these days we can all find a pretty good view.

The pros and cons of Image Stacking • This method is all about improving signal and reducing noise, and knowing when you need to apply it.

The Sharpstar hyperbolic astrograph • We test a 15-cm astrograph promising sharp images across a wide field. Does it deliver?

An f/3.3 masterpiece • Some works of art are worth the wait.

Seeding an interest in space • Curiosity for the cosmos will spark a new generation of enthusiasts.

Jim Pollock

Astrophotos from our readers

My time of transits • Warning: Watching a planet cross the face of the Sun is highly infectious!


Expand title description text
Frequency: Every other month Pages: 84 Publisher: Paragon Media Pty Ltd Edition: November - December 2020

OverDrive Magazine

  • Release date: October 8, 2020

Formats

OverDrive Magazine

subjects

Science

Languages

English

Australian Sky & Telescope is a world-class magazine about the science and hobby of astronomy. Combining the formidable worldwide resources of its venerable parent magazine with the talents of the best science writers and photographers in Australia, Australian Sky & Telescope is

Astronomy – not a nerdy pursuit

AUSTRALIAN SKY & TELESCOPE

No signs of life in Vela…

.. but signs of life on Venus?

Jupiter might have 600 moons

Astronomers find SN 1987A’s neutron star

Close encounters in the Milky Way’s bulge

Astronomy in transit • The Sun-centred Solar System led to accurate planetary predictions.

The David Malin Awards 2020 • Winning images from Australia’s major astrophoto competition.

To touch the SUN • NASA’s Parker Solar Probe is on a record-breaking journey to study our nearest star.

TO THE SUN, VIA VENUS

NEW PRODUCT SHOWCASE

The Radio Sky • Astronomers have invented a variety of novel approaches to observe the longest wavelengths of the electromagnetic spectrum.

LONG WAVES AND LONGER WAVES

Star Clocks • Measurements of stellar rotation give astronomers insight into stars’ ages. But they’ve also unearthed a mystery.

How a Star Slows Down

The wanderer

USING THE STAR CHART

Shine on with firsts and bests • Come get your share of the November night sky.

Giants stride the sky • The Solar System’s two largest planets are unmissable in the west sky after sunset.

SKY PHENOMENA

Sparks from Leo & Taurus

LUNAR PHENOMENA

Best for binoculars • Comet C/2020 M3 (ATLAS) is well placed for southern observers, and might reach magnitude 9.

An opposite attraction • Far from the Galactic centre, T Tauri is the star of the show.

CELESTIAL CALENDAR

NOVEMBER’S LUNAR ECLIPSE • Watch the Moon slip through Earth’s faint outer shadow.

The changing face of Mars • The Red Planet’s shifting sands bring changes to the Martian landscape.

Become a planetary pro • Innovative use of accessories can enhance your observing experience.

The lost discoveries of E.E Barnard • The famed American astronomer was an avid observer yet didn’t publish many of his findings — now, his unreported discoveries are coming to light.

BARNARD’S COMET DISCOVERIES AND ASSOCIATED FINDS

My virtual comet sighting • There’s nothing like being there, but these days we can all find a pretty good view.

The pros and cons of Image Stacking • This method is all about improving signal and reducing noise, and knowing when you need to apply it.

The Sharpstar hyperbolic astrograph • We test a 15-cm astrograph promising sharp images across a wide field. Does it deliver?

An f/3.3 masterpiece • Some works of art are worth the wait.

Seeding an interest in space • Curiosity for the cosmos will spark a new generation of enthusiasts.

Jim Pollock

Astrophotos from our readers

My time of transits • Warning: Watching a planet cross the face of the Sun is highly infectious!


Expand title description text