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Australian Sky & Telescope

July - August 2021
Magazine

Australian Sky & Telescope is a world-class magazine about the science and hobby of astronomy. Combining the formidable worldwide resources of its venerable parent magazine with the talents of the best science writers and photographers in Australia, Australian Sky & Telescope is

Australian Sky & Telescope

Halley’s Comet and me

The magnetic fields surrounding M87’s black hole

New studies suggest the universe is expanding faster

Is an ocean of water trapped in the Martian crust?

Bits of Theia might be hidden in Earth’s mantle

Amateur astronomers reveal galactic echoes

Explaining the alignment of our galaxy’s entourage

Star-shredding black hole makes high-energy neutrino

Second Earth trojan observed

Our ‘Local Arm’ is longer than thought

The Great Red Spot gets smaller… but stronger

Father, son and the changing universe • David and Johannes Fabricius’ observations helped kick start modern astronomy.

Relics of a Distant Past • A combination of observations and simulations is upending our ideas about how globular clusters formed.

The Magellanic Giant • A flood of new data plus a good deal of tenacity has revolutionised our understanding of the Milky Way’s largest companion.

Giovanni Domenico Cassini and the birth of Big Science • Innovations from an underappreciated 17th-century astronomer still reverberate today.

Cassini and the speed of light

Pathway to Pluto • Journey into eastern Sagittarius to locate this remote dwarf planet.

you • Before you purchase your dream astrophotography rig, consider what you can do with a basic setup.

USING THE STAR CHART

Scorpion tales

The path from Arcturus to Vega • Let these two stars guide you across the northern horizon.

Giants of the opposition • Expect some great viewing as Jupiter and Saturn reach opposition in August.

SKY PHENOMENA

LUNAR PHENOMENA

Two showers peak in July • The Moon will interfere with these meteor moments.

A rejuvenated comet? • 15P/Finlay was once thought to be almost dead. Not anymore.

Supergiants that suddenly fade • RY Sagittarii is a classic R Coronae Borealis star.

Saturnian Challenges • With Saturn reaching opposition on August 2, see if you can spot these elusive features in the planet’s rings.

Homing in on Hebe

ACTION AT JUPITER

NEW PRODUCT SHOWCASE

Mid-south planetary • Come of a tour of some exquisite nebulae found at mid-southern declinations.

Behind the shield • One part of Scutum succumbs to light pollution; another holds up just fine.

Halley’s Com et: A look back and ahead • Remembering the most recent return of the most famous “dirty snowball” of all.

QHYCCD’s newest planetary camera • We test a versatile, high-speed colour video camera designed for planetary imaging.

The Trolley Dob • This mount is about as simple as it gets.

Western Australia leads the way • WA events are taking advantage of some of the world’s best skies.

Stephen Voss

Astrophotos from our readers

Join the exoplanet watch • Do you have a desire to contribute to a NASA project? With the right equipment you can, from your own backyard.

Salvaging the night • The author is caught off-guard — in the most pleasing way.


Expand title description text
Frequency: Every other month Pages: 84 Publisher: Paragon Media Pty Ltd Edition: July - August 2021

OverDrive Magazine

  • Release date: June 9, 2021

Formats

OverDrive Magazine

subjects

Science

Languages

English

Australian Sky & Telescope is a world-class magazine about the science and hobby of astronomy. Combining the formidable worldwide resources of its venerable parent magazine with the talents of the best science writers and photographers in Australia, Australian Sky & Telescope is

Australian Sky & Telescope

Halley’s Comet and me

The magnetic fields surrounding M87’s black hole

New studies suggest the universe is expanding faster

Is an ocean of water trapped in the Martian crust?

Bits of Theia might be hidden in Earth’s mantle

Amateur astronomers reveal galactic echoes

Explaining the alignment of our galaxy’s entourage

Star-shredding black hole makes high-energy neutrino

Second Earth trojan observed

Our ‘Local Arm’ is longer than thought

The Great Red Spot gets smaller… but stronger

Father, son and the changing universe • David and Johannes Fabricius’ observations helped kick start modern astronomy.

Relics of a Distant Past • A combination of observations and simulations is upending our ideas about how globular clusters formed.

The Magellanic Giant • A flood of new data plus a good deal of tenacity has revolutionised our understanding of the Milky Way’s largest companion.

Giovanni Domenico Cassini and the birth of Big Science • Innovations from an underappreciated 17th-century astronomer still reverberate today.

Cassini and the speed of light

Pathway to Pluto • Journey into eastern Sagittarius to locate this remote dwarf planet.

you • Before you purchase your dream astrophotography rig, consider what you can do with a basic setup.

USING THE STAR CHART

Scorpion tales

The path from Arcturus to Vega • Let these two stars guide you across the northern horizon.

Giants of the opposition • Expect some great viewing as Jupiter and Saturn reach opposition in August.

SKY PHENOMENA

LUNAR PHENOMENA

Two showers peak in July • The Moon will interfere with these meteor moments.

A rejuvenated comet? • 15P/Finlay was once thought to be almost dead. Not anymore.

Supergiants that suddenly fade • RY Sagittarii is a classic R Coronae Borealis star.

Saturnian Challenges • With Saturn reaching opposition on August 2, see if you can spot these elusive features in the planet’s rings.

Homing in on Hebe

ACTION AT JUPITER

NEW PRODUCT SHOWCASE

Mid-south planetary • Come of a tour of some exquisite nebulae found at mid-southern declinations.

Behind the shield • One part of Scutum succumbs to light pollution; another holds up just fine.

Halley’s Com et: A look back and ahead • Remembering the most recent return of the most famous “dirty snowball” of all.

QHYCCD’s newest planetary camera • We test a versatile, high-speed colour video camera designed for planetary imaging.

The Trolley Dob • This mount is about as simple as it gets.

Western Australia leads the way • WA events are taking advantage of some of the world’s best skies.

Stephen Voss

Astrophotos from our readers

Join the exoplanet watch • Do you have a desire to contribute to a NASA project? With the right equipment you can, from your own backyard.

Salvaging the night • The author is caught off-guard — in the most pleasing way.


Expand title description text