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Australian Sky & Telescope

March - April 2021
Magazine

Australian Sky & Telescope is a world-class magazine about the science and hobby of astronomy. Combining the formidable worldwide resources of its venerable parent magazine with the talents of the best science writers and photographers in Australia, Australian Sky & Telescope is

Experiencing the cosmos in images

AUSTRALIAN SKY & TELESCOPE

NEWS NOTES

IN BRIEF

Dawn of the asteroids • Looking back at a pioneering mission to Vesta and Ceres.

Celebrating celestial seas

Pieces of other worlds • Japan’s Hayabusa 2 has returned to Earth with samples of asteroid Ryugu, while China’s Chang’e 5 has brought back bits of the Moon.

HOW DID WE GET THE ASTEROID BELT? • The sparse swath of debris between Mars and Jupiter could tell us more about the Solar System’s earliest years than the planets themselves.

THE MAIN BELT

Essential astronomy reading • Australian-produced astronomy titles that are must-haves for all amateur astronomers. Order yours today; they make great gifts for your family and friends too!

The Great Dimming of Betelgeuse • Professional and amateur astronomers are working to understand why the famed red supergiant faded so dramatically.

WILL BETELGEUSE EVER GO SUPERNOVA?

The story of T Tauri • An infant star in Taurus helped reveal a truth once thought radical: The universe still makes new stars.

Protostar vs pre-main-sequence star

USING THE STAR CHART

Birthplace of worlds

In praise of Procyon • Alpha Canis Minoris is a serious underdog.

VISTAS

Lonesome Mars • The Red Planet will be alone in the evening sky for most of March and April.

Time to get ‘active’ • Two small showers to see

SKY PHENOMENA

LUNAR PHENOMENA

A ‘well matured’ comet • The prospects are pretty good for seeing C/2020 R4 (ATLAS) this autumn.

A triplet of variables • Get to know R, W and Z Chamaeleontis.

Lunar main sequence • Understanding lunar crater formation based on appearances.

Orion’s Club District • Going off the beaten track in Orion brings pleasant surprises.

Orion’s newborn nursery • Up for a challenge? Point your telescope toward M42 to spot newly born planetary systems.

Other Observations

Catch an ISS transit • Being in the right place at (exactly) the right time pays exciting dividends.

Picturing Galaxies • Here are some tips to get the most out of your galaxy images.

Evostar 150 APO Refractor

Sky-Watcher’s Evostar 150 APO Refractor • ED glass and advanced optical coatings push this two-element objective design to its full potential.

The trekking pole travel scope • Never leave home without it!

Recognising excellence • Science communication and astrophotography awards up for grabs.

Mark Blackford

Astrophotos from our readers

The next big one • The coronavirus pandemic reminds us that preparedness is critical when catastrophes come out of the blue, including from space.


Expand title description text
Frequency: Every other month Pages: 84 Publisher: Paragon Media Pty Ltd Edition: March - April 2021

OverDrive Magazine

  • Release date: February 10, 2021

Formats

OverDrive Magazine

subjects

Science

Languages

English

Australian Sky & Telescope is a world-class magazine about the science and hobby of astronomy. Combining the formidable worldwide resources of its venerable parent magazine with the talents of the best science writers and photographers in Australia, Australian Sky & Telescope is

Experiencing the cosmos in images

AUSTRALIAN SKY & TELESCOPE

NEWS NOTES

IN BRIEF

Dawn of the asteroids • Looking back at a pioneering mission to Vesta and Ceres.

Celebrating celestial seas

Pieces of other worlds • Japan’s Hayabusa 2 has returned to Earth with samples of asteroid Ryugu, while China’s Chang’e 5 has brought back bits of the Moon.

HOW DID WE GET THE ASTEROID BELT? • The sparse swath of debris between Mars and Jupiter could tell us more about the Solar System’s earliest years than the planets themselves.

THE MAIN BELT

Essential astronomy reading • Australian-produced astronomy titles that are must-haves for all amateur astronomers. Order yours today; they make great gifts for your family and friends too!

The Great Dimming of Betelgeuse • Professional and amateur astronomers are working to understand why the famed red supergiant faded so dramatically.

WILL BETELGEUSE EVER GO SUPERNOVA?

The story of T Tauri • An infant star in Taurus helped reveal a truth once thought radical: The universe still makes new stars.

Protostar vs pre-main-sequence star

USING THE STAR CHART

Birthplace of worlds

In praise of Procyon • Alpha Canis Minoris is a serious underdog.

VISTAS

Lonesome Mars • The Red Planet will be alone in the evening sky for most of March and April.

Time to get ‘active’ • Two small showers to see

SKY PHENOMENA

LUNAR PHENOMENA

A ‘well matured’ comet • The prospects are pretty good for seeing C/2020 R4 (ATLAS) this autumn.

A triplet of variables • Get to know R, W and Z Chamaeleontis.

Lunar main sequence • Understanding lunar crater formation based on appearances.

Orion’s Club District • Going off the beaten track in Orion brings pleasant surprises.

Orion’s newborn nursery • Up for a challenge? Point your telescope toward M42 to spot newly born planetary systems.

Other Observations

Catch an ISS transit • Being in the right place at (exactly) the right time pays exciting dividends.

Picturing Galaxies • Here are some tips to get the most out of your galaxy images.

Evostar 150 APO Refractor

Sky-Watcher’s Evostar 150 APO Refractor • ED glass and advanced optical coatings push this two-element objective design to its full potential.

The trekking pole travel scope • Never leave home without it!

Recognising excellence • Science communication and astrophotography awards up for grabs.

Mark Blackford

Astrophotos from our readers

The next big one • The coronavirus pandemic reminds us that preparedness is critical when catastrophes come out of the blue, including from space.


Expand title description text