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Australian Sky & Telescope

May - June 2021
Magazine

Australian Sky & Telescope is a world-class magazine about the science and hobby of astronomy. Combining the formidable worldwide resources of its venerable parent magazine with the talents of the best science writers and photographers in Australia, Australian Sky & Telescope is

A golden age for Mars missions

Australian Sky & Telescope

The most distant quasar and black hole birth

Astronomers spot galaxies clustering in early universe

NASA extends Mars, Jupiter missions

Rocky planet found around 10 billion-year-old star

Magnetic Whirlpool

Black hole feasts on star

Amateur finds jupiter’s ‘lost’ moons

Galactic one-two punch

Western sky wonders

Roving on Mars • NASA’s Perseverance rover has successfully landed on the Red Planet. Now the real work begins.

The Mystery of the Martian moons • Planetary scientists may soon discover how the Red Planet acquired its two potato-shaped companions.

PEEKABOO MOONS

Searching for signs of life • Finding signs of alien life requires more prep work than you might think.

ANAEROBES

Some thoughts about today s eyepieces • Eyepieces are just as important as telescopes when it comes to visual observing, but some of the conventional wisdom about them has changed over the years.

USING THE STAR CHART

Farewell autumn, hello winter

Gemini’s like and unlike twins • Castor and Pollux share many similarities, but both stars are unique.

VISTAS

Mars invades the Beehive • The Red Planet meets a star cluster while Venus and Mercury get close.

SKY PHENOMENA

LUNAR PHENOMENA

The Etas are back • Comet Halley’s progeny will light up the sky in mid-May.

Aussie bags 9th comet • The Halley-type comet is heading away from us.

MAY’S TOTAL LUNAR ECLIPSE • Get ready to watch the Moon pass through Earth’s shadow.

TT Cen’s double maximum • A rare kind of long-period variable.

Lunar skating rinks • Why are some craters filled with smooth lavas while others aren’t?

The Lion’s Galaxy Triplet • A compact collection of galaxies warrants a closer look.

Distances to Galaxies

I wish I’d known then what I know now • Learn from an experienced astrophotographer’s early mistakes.

NEW PRODUCT SHOWCASE

CHOOSING AN ASTROGRAPH • Here’s a clever way to compare features in deep sky imaging scopes before making a purchase.

Orion’s StarShoot G16 Deep Space Camera • We look at one of the latest offerings for budget-minded imagers.

A homebuilt carbon fibre refractor • For its size, this scope is surprisingly light and portable.

A slow return to normal • A few activities are returning to the astro calendar.

Steve Massey

Astrophotos from our readers

The cosmic conjunction • When the world gets you down, look up and tune into orbital time.

The “Wow” now • After four decades, a mysterious radio signal from space remains excessively elusive.


Expand title description text
Frequency: Every other month Pages: 84 Publisher: Paragon Media Pty Ltd Edition: May - June 2021

OverDrive Magazine

  • Release date: April 7, 2021

Formats

OverDrive Magazine

subjects

Science

Languages

English

Australian Sky & Telescope is a world-class magazine about the science and hobby of astronomy. Combining the formidable worldwide resources of its venerable parent magazine with the talents of the best science writers and photographers in Australia, Australian Sky & Telescope is

A golden age for Mars missions

Australian Sky & Telescope

The most distant quasar and black hole birth

Astronomers spot galaxies clustering in early universe

NASA extends Mars, Jupiter missions

Rocky planet found around 10 billion-year-old star

Magnetic Whirlpool

Black hole feasts on star

Amateur finds jupiter’s ‘lost’ moons

Galactic one-two punch

Western sky wonders

Roving on Mars • NASA’s Perseverance rover has successfully landed on the Red Planet. Now the real work begins.

The Mystery of the Martian moons • Planetary scientists may soon discover how the Red Planet acquired its two potato-shaped companions.

PEEKABOO MOONS

Searching for signs of life • Finding signs of alien life requires more prep work than you might think.

ANAEROBES

Some thoughts about today s eyepieces • Eyepieces are just as important as telescopes when it comes to visual observing, but some of the conventional wisdom about them has changed over the years.

USING THE STAR CHART

Farewell autumn, hello winter

Gemini’s like and unlike twins • Castor and Pollux share many similarities, but both stars are unique.

VISTAS

Mars invades the Beehive • The Red Planet meets a star cluster while Venus and Mercury get close.

SKY PHENOMENA

LUNAR PHENOMENA

The Etas are back • Comet Halley’s progeny will light up the sky in mid-May.

Aussie bags 9th comet • The Halley-type comet is heading away from us.

MAY’S TOTAL LUNAR ECLIPSE • Get ready to watch the Moon pass through Earth’s shadow.

TT Cen’s double maximum • A rare kind of long-period variable.

Lunar skating rinks • Why are some craters filled with smooth lavas while others aren’t?

The Lion’s Galaxy Triplet • A compact collection of galaxies warrants a closer look.

Distances to Galaxies

I wish I’d known then what I know now • Learn from an experienced astrophotographer’s early mistakes.

NEW PRODUCT SHOWCASE

CHOOSING AN ASTROGRAPH • Here’s a clever way to compare features in deep sky imaging scopes before making a purchase.

Orion’s StarShoot G16 Deep Space Camera • We look at one of the latest offerings for budget-minded imagers.

A homebuilt carbon fibre refractor • For its size, this scope is surprisingly light and portable.

A slow return to normal • A few activities are returning to the astro calendar.

Steve Massey

Astrophotos from our readers

The cosmic conjunction • When the world gets you down, look up and tune into orbital time.

The “Wow” now • After four decades, a mysterious radio signal from space remains excessively elusive.


Expand title description text