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Australian Sky & Telescope

February/March 2019
Magazine

Australian Sky & Telescope is a world-class magazine about the science and hobby of astronomy. Combining the formidable worldwide resources of its venerable parent magazine with the talents of the best science writers and photographers in Australia, Australian Sky & Telescope is

The days of DIY astronomy

Mission to Mercury on its way

Low-key blast marks possible birth of neutron star duo

Evidence mounts for mighty Magellanic collision

The Kepler era comes to an end

Sunset for Dawn

Ancient merger wreckage in the Milky Way

Some stars may be intergalactic visitors

A star goes off • The first bright supernova in 400 years both answered and posed questions.

Pulsar Timing Arrays • Astronomers are watching dozens of cosmic timepieces for signs of spacetime ripples passing through.

The Solar System barycentre

Meet the Neighbours • Astronomers are compiling a census of the nearest stars to discover what we know — and what we don’t — about our stellar neighbours.

Rogues gallery • Of the 378 stars in the RECONS 10-parsec census, which ones stand out? Here are five of our most interesting stellar neighbours:

Essential astronomy reading • These Australian-produced titles are must-haves observing guides for all astronomy enthusiasts. Order yours today!

Space Missions in 2019

What Came Before the BIG BANG? • Cosmologists are tackling a once-verboten question with out-of-the-box thinking.

ENTROPY

The world’s first female PROFESSIONAL ASTRONOMER • Who was the first woman paid to study the stars?

Adelaide set for lift-off • South Australia becomes home to the new Australian Space Agency.

USING THE STAR CHART

Between the clusters

The second star • The second brightest star in our skies is a very intriguing object.

Venus and Saturn meet in the morning • The planetary duo will dance among the stars in the pre-dawn sky.

Alpha points the way • An easy-to-see shower for February.

SKY PHENOMENA

LUNAR PHENOMENA

Mysteries of the sungrazers • Historical records are helping to overcome mistaken cometary identities.

The dog and the dwarf • Spot HL Canis Majoris in outburst

Echoes from a variable star • RS Puppis continues to delight astronomers more than 120 years after its true nature was discovered.

It’s all about the ears • A few short hops lead from a carbon star to a planetary nebula and a pair of interacting galaxies.

A dusty apparition • Mars was bustling with activity during the close opposition of 2018.

Fleming’s semicircular indentation • Can you see the Horsehead Nebula? It’s all about contrast and scale.

Giving nebulae a BOOST • Here’s a novel technique to bring out emission nebulosity in your astrophotos.

Sky-Watcher AZ-GTi and Evostar 72 refractor • This duo brings new meaning to the old saying that good things come in small packages.

A giant breakthrough • This innovative scope incorporates new ATM advances on three separate fronts.

Dob’s Hole

Space celebrations • 2019 will see a bumper crop of astrofests and other science events.

2019 CALENDAR

David Hough

Astrophotos from our readers

Sight unseen • On a fine observing night with friends, an amateur astronomer got an alarming surprise.


Expand title description text
Frequency: Every other month Pages: 84 Publisher: Paragon Media Pty Ltd Edition: February/March 2019

OverDrive Magazine

  • Release date: January 9, 2019

Formats

OverDrive Magazine

subjects

Science

Languages

English

Australian Sky & Telescope is a world-class magazine about the science and hobby of astronomy. Combining the formidable worldwide resources of its venerable parent magazine with the talents of the best science writers and photographers in Australia, Australian Sky & Telescope is

The days of DIY astronomy

Mission to Mercury on its way

Low-key blast marks possible birth of neutron star duo

Evidence mounts for mighty Magellanic collision

The Kepler era comes to an end

Sunset for Dawn

Ancient merger wreckage in the Milky Way

Some stars may be intergalactic visitors

A star goes off • The first bright supernova in 400 years both answered and posed questions.

Pulsar Timing Arrays • Astronomers are watching dozens of cosmic timepieces for signs of spacetime ripples passing through.

The Solar System barycentre

Meet the Neighbours • Astronomers are compiling a census of the nearest stars to discover what we know — and what we don’t — about our stellar neighbours.

Rogues gallery • Of the 378 stars in the RECONS 10-parsec census, which ones stand out? Here are five of our most interesting stellar neighbours:

Essential astronomy reading • These Australian-produced titles are must-haves observing guides for all astronomy enthusiasts. Order yours today!

Space Missions in 2019

What Came Before the BIG BANG? • Cosmologists are tackling a once-verboten question with out-of-the-box thinking.

ENTROPY

The world’s first female PROFESSIONAL ASTRONOMER • Who was the first woman paid to study the stars?

Adelaide set for lift-off • South Australia becomes home to the new Australian Space Agency.

USING THE STAR CHART

Between the clusters

The second star • The second brightest star in our skies is a very intriguing object.

Venus and Saturn meet in the morning • The planetary duo will dance among the stars in the pre-dawn sky.

Alpha points the way • An easy-to-see shower for February.

SKY PHENOMENA

LUNAR PHENOMENA

Mysteries of the sungrazers • Historical records are helping to overcome mistaken cometary identities.

The dog and the dwarf • Spot HL Canis Majoris in outburst

Echoes from a variable star • RS Puppis continues to delight astronomers more than 120 years after its true nature was discovered.

It’s all about the ears • A few short hops lead from a carbon star to a planetary nebula and a pair of interacting galaxies.

A dusty apparition • Mars was bustling with activity during the close opposition of 2018.

Fleming’s semicircular indentation • Can you see the Horsehead Nebula? It’s all about contrast and scale.

Giving nebulae a BOOST • Here’s a novel technique to bring out emission nebulosity in your astrophotos.

Sky-Watcher AZ-GTi and Evostar 72 refractor • This duo brings new meaning to the old saying that good things come in small packages.

A giant breakthrough • This innovative scope incorporates new ATM advances on three separate fronts.

Dob’s Hole

Space celebrations • 2019 will see a bumper crop of astrofests and other science events.

2019 CALENDAR

David Hough

Astrophotos from our readers

Sight unseen • On a fine observing night with friends, an amateur astronomer got an alarming surprise.


Expand title description text