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Science Illustrated

Issue 84
Magazine

Science Illustrated delivers natural science, break through discoveries and an understanding of the world for the entire family. Packed with stunning photography and in-depth editorial it’s a visually spectacular gateway to the world looking into the beginning of life to distant objects in the universe.

SUBSCRIBE & START SAVING NOW!

Science Illustrated

The Southern Titan: our largest dinosaur

Playful little sucker: octopus selfie wins a prize

Betelguese is closer, smaller, and not about to go supernova • Australian scientists have solved the mystery of fluctuations in the giant star Betelgeuse. It is not set to explode, as astronomers had predicted. It’s also much closer than they thought.

‘Impossible’ life found under the ice • Biologists have found colonies of fungi and other creatures under the sea ice off Antarctica, even though there is hardly anything there to feed on.

Your hand’s blood vessels are your new fingerprints • An infrared image of your hand can identify you with a 99.8% success rate.

Cyanobacteria could make a meal for Martian settlers • New experiments prove that robust organisms from Earth could supply a future Mars base with both oxygen and food.

Even hydras like a nap – but why sleep when you have no brain? • A new discovery indicates that sleep is a far more basic need than scientists have thought.

New law of growth describes horns, thorns and teeth

Mice walk again after gene therapy • Paralysis caused by spinal cord injury has so far been incurable. Now gene therapy for mice indicates that injuries might be repaired so that paralysed people could regain the use of limbs.

Electric eels found hunting in groups • Collective hunting allows electric eels to combine the voltage delivered by individual eels, improving their ability to paralyse groups of fish.

MEET OUR YOUNG AUSSIE SCIENTISTS!

Monash robot aims to be pick of the crop

Driverless trucks could beat autonomous cars to the road • Trucks have advantages over cars when it comes to operating without human drivers. An American company is planning trials to establish the success and safety of automated transport.

CSIRO’s technology for multi-sat chat • Technology used in Western Australia's ASKAP radio telescope array could solve the problem of communicating with thousands of new satellites planned for launch over the next decade.

How clean is fruit after we rinse it? • Most of us are taught to rinse a piece of fruit before we eat it. But what is it that we’re trying to remove, and will the fruit be completely clean after we wash it?

TOP 5 · Which animal’s heart beats the fastest? • A human heart beats faster than that of an elephant, but more slowly than that of a cat. So which animal’s heart has been found to have the most beats per minute?

What are goosebumps? • Cold, fright or pleasure can cause these small hard bumps to appear on the body. But why do goosebumps materialise, and what are they good for?

Memory sticks keep getting more memory. Is there a limit? • Hard drives and USB sticks seem to get ever more capacity. Will the trend continue, or is there a limit?

Can skyscrapers affect Earth’s rotation? • “If I spin around and then stretch out my arms, it slows the spin. Do skyscrapers affect Earth’s rotation in the same way?”

WHAT IS THIS? · The surface of a lotus flower leaf • Have you ever seen how water quickly slides off the leaves of lotus flowers? This photo shows shows why. Small bumps make it difficult for water drops to stick to the surface.

How can eye colour change? • Many babies have blue eyes, but the colour sometimes changes with age. Why?

What if our Solar System had two suns? • How would our Solar System be different...


Expand title description text
Frequency: Every other month Pages: 84 Publisher: Nextmedia Pty Ltd Edition: Issue 84

OverDrive Magazine

  • Release date: June 30, 2021

Formats

OverDrive Magazine

subjects

Science

Languages

English

Science Illustrated delivers natural science, break through discoveries and an understanding of the world for the entire family. Packed with stunning photography and in-depth editorial it’s a visually spectacular gateway to the world looking into the beginning of life to distant objects in the universe.

SUBSCRIBE & START SAVING NOW!

Science Illustrated

The Southern Titan: our largest dinosaur

Playful little sucker: octopus selfie wins a prize

Betelguese is closer, smaller, and not about to go supernova • Australian scientists have solved the mystery of fluctuations in the giant star Betelgeuse. It is not set to explode, as astronomers had predicted. It’s also much closer than they thought.

‘Impossible’ life found under the ice • Biologists have found colonies of fungi and other creatures under the sea ice off Antarctica, even though there is hardly anything there to feed on.

Your hand’s blood vessels are your new fingerprints • An infrared image of your hand can identify you with a 99.8% success rate.

Cyanobacteria could make a meal for Martian settlers • New experiments prove that robust organisms from Earth could supply a future Mars base with both oxygen and food.

Even hydras like a nap – but why sleep when you have no brain? • A new discovery indicates that sleep is a far more basic need than scientists have thought.

New law of growth describes horns, thorns and teeth

Mice walk again after gene therapy • Paralysis caused by spinal cord injury has so far been incurable. Now gene therapy for mice indicates that injuries might be repaired so that paralysed people could regain the use of limbs.

Electric eels found hunting in groups • Collective hunting allows electric eels to combine the voltage delivered by individual eels, improving their ability to paralyse groups of fish.

MEET OUR YOUNG AUSSIE SCIENTISTS!

Monash robot aims to be pick of the crop

Driverless trucks could beat autonomous cars to the road • Trucks have advantages over cars when it comes to operating without human drivers. An American company is planning trials to establish the success and safety of automated transport.

CSIRO’s technology for multi-sat chat • Technology used in Western Australia's ASKAP radio telescope array could solve the problem of communicating with thousands of new satellites planned for launch over the next decade.

How clean is fruit after we rinse it? • Most of us are taught to rinse a piece of fruit before we eat it. But what is it that we’re trying to remove, and will the fruit be completely clean after we wash it?

TOP 5 · Which animal’s heart beats the fastest? • A human heart beats faster than that of an elephant, but more slowly than that of a cat. So which animal’s heart has been found to have the most beats per minute?

What are goosebumps? • Cold, fright or pleasure can cause these small hard bumps to appear on the body. But why do goosebumps materialise, and what are they good for?

Memory sticks keep getting more memory. Is there a limit? • Hard drives and USB sticks seem to get ever more capacity. Will the trend continue, or is there a limit?

Can skyscrapers affect Earth’s rotation? • “If I spin around and then stretch out my arms, it slows the spin. Do skyscrapers affect Earth’s rotation in the same way?”

WHAT IS THIS? · The surface of a lotus flower leaf • Have you ever seen how water quickly slides off the leaves of lotus flowers? This photo shows shows why. Small bumps make it difficult for water drops to stick to the surface.

How can eye colour change? • Many babies have blue eyes, but the colour sometimes changes with age. Why?

What if our Solar System had two suns? • How would our Solar System be different...


Expand title description text