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Australian Sky & Telescope

Jul 01 2019
Magazine

Australian Sky & Telescope is a world-class magazine about the science and hobby of astronomy. Combining the formidable worldwide resources of its venerable parent magazine with the talents of the best science writers and photographers in Australia, Australian Sky & Telescope is

Remembering Tranquility Base

Australian Sky & Telescope

Scientists unveil first black hole image

Is there methane on Mars?

IN BRIEF

Ryugu vs. Bennu: Updates from the asteroids

Two galaxies are missing their dark matter

Could dark matter be black holes?

Fifty years of lunar geology • The Apollo 11 mission gave us our first chance to examine pieces of another world.

Constant • Astronomers and cosmologists can’t agree on the value of the Hubble constant — the number that describes the current expansion rate of the universe. A solution to the problem is nowhere in sight.

HOW FAST DOES THE UNIVERSE EXPAND?

How astronomers calculate H0 from supernovae

How astronomers calculate H0 from the CMB

KEEP YOUR DISTANCE

OTHER WAYS TO MEASURE THE HUBBLE CONSTANT • The current expansion rate of the universe can be derived from precise measurements of distances and ‘recession’ velocities of remote galaxies, or calculated from cosmological models and the observed properties of the cosmic microwave background — both approaches are discussed in the main story. But there are other ways to measure the Hubble constant, H0:

NEW PRODUCT SHOWCASE

The science of APOLLO • Rocks brought back by the astronauts revolutionised our understanding of the Moon.

Grains from the Past

Parkes & the Apollo 11 moonwalk • Australia’s very own ‘dish’ played a vital role in bringing the first footsteps on another world to television screens around the globe.

Lighting a Cosmic Fuse • Type Ia supernovae — the cosmic mileposts that helped prove the universe is accelerating — are not as uniform as astronomers once thought they were.

THE MASS LIMIT

DIFFERENT DWARFS

USING THE STAR CHART

Centaurus clusters

The colours of winter • Look up into July’s night sky to see stars tinged with orange, yellow, blue and possibly even green.

Saturn shines in Sagittarius • Great viewing as the ringed planet reaches opposition this month.

Duelling winter showers • Moonless nights at the end of July will be perfect for meteor watching.

A very intriguing comet • Did C/2017 T2 (PANSTARRS) undergo an outburst earlier this year, and can we expect an impressive show by late-winter?

Three in Scorpius • R, S and T Scorpius are found in and near Messier 80.

Lamont: The shadow knows • Did NASA’s GRAIL mission reveal the true identity of a ghostly lunar feature?

No NGC Clusters • Look beyond the pages of the classic catalogue to find these star clusters.

Lunar darkness in the dawn • Our only lunar eclipse for 2019 is a morning twilight event.

The Allure of Betelgeuse • Astronomers are itching to know when this red supergiant will go supernova, but a clear answer eludes them.

WHY AN IRON CORE MEANS THE END IS NEAR

The Quest for Round Stars • Great deep sky imaging begins with well-tracked exposures.

Meade DSI-IV monochrome camera

Meade’s DSI-IV camera • Could this be the best astronomical camera yet offered by Meade? The answer depends on your imaging interests.

A 3D-printed binoscope • No workshop? No problem.

Celestial celebrations • Start your own space race to see how many events you can take in.

2019 CALENDAR

Colin Bembrick

Astrophotos from our readers

Next Issue ON SALE July 18

Voyager 2: A personal voyage • A...


Expand title description text
Frequency: Every other month Pages: 84 Publisher: Paragon Media Pty Ltd Edition: Jul 01 2019

OverDrive Magazine

  • Release date: May 29, 2019

Formats

OverDrive Magazine

subjects

Science

Languages

English

Australian Sky & Telescope is a world-class magazine about the science and hobby of astronomy. Combining the formidable worldwide resources of its venerable parent magazine with the talents of the best science writers and photographers in Australia, Australian Sky & Telescope is

Remembering Tranquility Base

Australian Sky & Telescope

Scientists unveil first black hole image

Is there methane on Mars?

IN BRIEF

Ryugu vs. Bennu: Updates from the asteroids

Two galaxies are missing their dark matter

Could dark matter be black holes?

Fifty years of lunar geology • The Apollo 11 mission gave us our first chance to examine pieces of another world.

Constant • Astronomers and cosmologists can’t agree on the value of the Hubble constant — the number that describes the current expansion rate of the universe. A solution to the problem is nowhere in sight.

HOW FAST DOES THE UNIVERSE EXPAND?

How astronomers calculate H0 from supernovae

How astronomers calculate H0 from the CMB

KEEP YOUR DISTANCE

OTHER WAYS TO MEASURE THE HUBBLE CONSTANT • The current expansion rate of the universe can be derived from precise measurements of distances and ‘recession’ velocities of remote galaxies, or calculated from cosmological models and the observed properties of the cosmic microwave background — both approaches are discussed in the main story. But there are other ways to measure the Hubble constant, H0:

NEW PRODUCT SHOWCASE

The science of APOLLO • Rocks brought back by the astronauts revolutionised our understanding of the Moon.

Grains from the Past

Parkes & the Apollo 11 moonwalk • Australia’s very own ‘dish’ played a vital role in bringing the first footsteps on another world to television screens around the globe.

Lighting a Cosmic Fuse • Type Ia supernovae — the cosmic mileposts that helped prove the universe is accelerating — are not as uniform as astronomers once thought they were.

THE MASS LIMIT

DIFFERENT DWARFS

USING THE STAR CHART

Centaurus clusters

The colours of winter • Look up into July’s night sky to see stars tinged with orange, yellow, blue and possibly even green.

Saturn shines in Sagittarius • Great viewing as the ringed planet reaches opposition this month.

Duelling winter showers • Moonless nights at the end of July will be perfect for meteor watching.

A very intriguing comet • Did C/2017 T2 (PANSTARRS) undergo an outburst earlier this year, and can we expect an impressive show by late-winter?

Three in Scorpius • R, S and T Scorpius are found in and near Messier 80.

Lamont: The shadow knows • Did NASA’s GRAIL mission reveal the true identity of a ghostly lunar feature?

No NGC Clusters • Look beyond the pages of the classic catalogue to find these star clusters.

Lunar darkness in the dawn • Our only lunar eclipse for 2019 is a morning twilight event.

The Allure of Betelgeuse • Astronomers are itching to know when this red supergiant will go supernova, but a clear answer eludes them.

WHY AN IRON CORE MEANS THE END IS NEAR

The Quest for Round Stars • Great deep sky imaging begins with well-tracked exposures.

Meade DSI-IV monochrome camera

Meade’s DSI-IV camera • Could this be the best astronomical camera yet offered by Meade? The answer depends on your imaging interests.

A 3D-printed binoscope • No workshop? No problem.

Celestial celebrations • Start your own space race to see how many events you can take in.

2019 CALENDAR

Colin Bembrick

Astrophotos from our readers

Next Issue ON SALE July 18

Voyager 2: A personal voyage • A...


Expand title description text