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Australian Sky & Telescope

November/December 2019
Magazine

Australian Sky & Telescope is a world-class magazine about the science and hobby of astronomy. Combining the formidable worldwide resources of its venerable parent magazine with the talents of the best science writers and photographers in Australia, Australian Sky & Telescope is

Here comes the Sun

Australian Sky & Telescope

Amateur finds another interstellar visitor

German-Russian satellite to map the X-ray sky

TESS finds hundreds of planet candidates in southern sky

Hubble constant tension continues

Astronomers map our galaxy’s warp

IN BRIEF

VISTAS

Mapping the Milky Way • Recent years have seen tremendous strides in unravelling the galaxy’s spiral arms, and the next decade promises the best maps ever made of our celestial home.

OUR GALAXY

What’s in a name?

Cosmic mariners • Astronomers chart the vastness of space by tracking the currents that galaxies swim in.

THE GREAT ATTRACTOR

Seeing stars • Astronomers are linking arrays of telescopes together to reveal the long-hidden visages of faraway suns.

HOW INTERFEROMETRY WORKS

Demystifying image calibration • This important step will dramatically improve your imaging results.

Essential astronomy reading • These Australian-produced titles are must-haves for all astronomy enthusiasts. Order yours today, and don’t forget your friends and family for Christmas!

USING THE STAR CHART

Eyes opened by an open cluster

Eternity in the sky tonight • Can you ‘witness’ eternity in an hour?

Planetary triple treat • Three planets line up in November’s early evening sky.

Moonlight meddles • Don’t let lunar light spoil your enjoyment of these meteor showers.

SKY PHENOMENA

LUNAR PHENOMENA

Christmas comets • Comets and Christmas seem to go together, but not always successfully.

Hunt this star in the Hunter • ‘W’ is for Williamena, women more widely and W Orionis.

Monitoring the Sun with Neptune • A long campaign to measure the variability of our star produced unexpected results.

Dark clouds in Taurus • Set yourself a challenge and spend a night or more navigating through nebulae in an under-observed part of the sky.

Daytime astronomy • A transit of Mercury and a solar eclipse to end the year.

The path to totality • Enthusiasts are preparing their travel itineraries for the 2020 total solar eclipse in South America.

Advancing amateur research programs • The Edward Corbould Research Fund is helping amateur astronomers conduct serious scientific work.

Spotlight on a Seyfert • The author takes a close look at one of the nearest and brightest Seyfert galaxies through a 1.2-metre telescope.

Celestron’s RASA 8 Schmidt Astrograph • Lightning-fast imaging now comes in a popular-size package.

JMI Heavy-Duty Medium-Size Universal Wheeley Bar

JMI Heavy-Duty Wheeley Bar • This novel accessory helps you move your large scope with minimal effort.

Sea change on Venus • Tidal drag from a putative ocean might have helped cool our sister planet for billions of years.

The ‘Binocrane’ parallelogram mount • Steady support is a must for binoculars.

Annual conferences • Amateur astronomy get-togethers on both sides of the Tasman.

2019 CALENDAR

John Drummond

Astrophotos from our readers

HOW TO SUBMIT YOUR IMAGES

Close encounters with the law • A criminal law expert who also stargazes offers safety tips for amateur astronomers.


Expand title description text
Frequency: Every other month Pages: 84 Publisher: Paragon Media Pty Ltd Edition: November/December 2019

OverDrive Magazine

  • Release date: October 16, 2019

Formats

OverDrive Magazine

subjects

Science

Languages

English

Australian Sky & Telescope is a world-class magazine about the science and hobby of astronomy. Combining the formidable worldwide resources of its venerable parent magazine with the talents of the best science writers and photographers in Australia, Australian Sky & Telescope is

Here comes the Sun

Australian Sky & Telescope

Amateur finds another interstellar visitor

German-Russian satellite to map the X-ray sky

TESS finds hundreds of planet candidates in southern sky

Hubble constant tension continues

Astronomers map our galaxy’s warp

IN BRIEF

VISTAS

Mapping the Milky Way • Recent years have seen tremendous strides in unravelling the galaxy’s spiral arms, and the next decade promises the best maps ever made of our celestial home.

OUR GALAXY

What’s in a name?

Cosmic mariners • Astronomers chart the vastness of space by tracking the currents that galaxies swim in.

THE GREAT ATTRACTOR

Seeing stars • Astronomers are linking arrays of telescopes together to reveal the long-hidden visages of faraway suns.

HOW INTERFEROMETRY WORKS

Demystifying image calibration • This important step will dramatically improve your imaging results.

Essential astronomy reading • These Australian-produced titles are must-haves for all astronomy enthusiasts. Order yours today, and don’t forget your friends and family for Christmas!

USING THE STAR CHART

Eyes opened by an open cluster

Eternity in the sky tonight • Can you ‘witness’ eternity in an hour?

Planetary triple treat • Three planets line up in November’s early evening sky.

Moonlight meddles • Don’t let lunar light spoil your enjoyment of these meteor showers.

SKY PHENOMENA

LUNAR PHENOMENA

Christmas comets • Comets and Christmas seem to go together, but not always successfully.

Hunt this star in the Hunter • ‘W’ is for Williamena, women more widely and W Orionis.

Monitoring the Sun with Neptune • A long campaign to measure the variability of our star produced unexpected results.

Dark clouds in Taurus • Set yourself a challenge and spend a night or more navigating through nebulae in an under-observed part of the sky.

Daytime astronomy • A transit of Mercury and a solar eclipse to end the year.

The path to totality • Enthusiasts are preparing their travel itineraries for the 2020 total solar eclipse in South America.

Advancing amateur research programs • The Edward Corbould Research Fund is helping amateur astronomers conduct serious scientific work.

Spotlight on a Seyfert • The author takes a close look at one of the nearest and brightest Seyfert galaxies through a 1.2-metre telescope.

Celestron’s RASA 8 Schmidt Astrograph • Lightning-fast imaging now comes in a popular-size package.

JMI Heavy-Duty Medium-Size Universal Wheeley Bar

JMI Heavy-Duty Wheeley Bar • This novel accessory helps you move your large scope with minimal effort.

Sea change on Venus • Tidal drag from a putative ocean might have helped cool our sister planet for billions of years.

The ‘Binocrane’ parallelogram mount • Steady support is a must for binoculars.

Annual conferences • Amateur astronomy get-togethers on both sides of the Tasman.

2019 CALENDAR

John Drummond

Astrophotos from our readers

HOW TO SUBMIT YOUR IMAGES

Close encounters with the law • A criminal law expert who also stargazes offers safety tips for amateur astronomers.


Expand title description text