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Australian Sky & Telescope

Oct 01 2018
Magazine

Australian Sky & Telescope is a world-class magazine about the science and hobby of astronomy. Combining the formidable worldwide resources of its venerable parent magazine with the talents of the best science writers and photographers in Australia, Australian Sky & Telescope is

Always new things to learn

10 new moons for Jupiter

Organics inside Enceladus: complex enough for life?

Best long-range test of general relativity

Pulsar test limits the existence of a ‘fifth force’

Destroyed star feeds a black hole’s jet

A magnifying glass for a pulsar

Long-ago supervolcano created Mars rock formation

Hayabusa 2 arrives at asteroid Ryugu

IN BRIEF

The day the universe grew • Edwin Hubble’s observations showed us that the Milky Way is not all that there is.

SHADOW Science • As the Moon’s shadow crossed the Earth last year, researchers mounted intensive campaigns to study every aspect of the dramatic event.

Expanded roles for citizen scientists

Future Martian invasion?

Pioneer of a NEW astronomy • He’s largely forgotten, yet John Bolton founded a new type of science and probably should have been awarded the Nobel Prize.

To catch a falling star • Improve your chances of success by observing during an annual meteor shower.

The Moon Mess • A planet-scale smash created Earth’s satellite. But how did it come to be so like Earth?

Planets and Moons side by side • The Moon is the fifth-largest natural satellite in the Solar System, both in size and mass — even outranking Europa and Triton. In comparison with the giant planets that host the other large moons, though, Earth is puny. Worlds are shown to scale by radius. Sizes and mass ratios are rounded to the nearest 10.

`Oumuamua’s Dramatic visit • The space rock from beyond the Solar System has left us amazed and perplexed.

USING THE STAR CHART

A peek behind the curtain

The Sea Goat in the sky • The ancient constellation Capricornus has an interesting history.

An early evening blockbuster • Mercury, Venus, Mars, Jupiter and Saturn all share top billing this month.

Orionids by moonlight • The lunar glow will affect this month’s best meteor shower.

LUNAR PHENOMENA

SKY PHENOMENA

Voyage through the Telescope • Aptly named southern constellation is home to some pleasing doubles.

S Dor stars in the SMC • Two stellar targets in a challenging field.

Spring’s comet collection • There’s plenty of comet action in the southern sky during October.

A nod to lunar libration • Every month, the Moon’s face wobbles enough to give you a peek at some of its hidden farside.

Square galaxies • Spend some time hunting this group of faint fuzzies in the Great Square of Pegasus.

Giants walk among the stars • Uranus and Neptune are ideally placed for viewing in the evening sky.

Maroon Moon • The Moon turned red on the morning of July 28, as it slid into the Earth’s shadow for the longest lunar eclipse of the century.

Shoot the sky • Just getting started in astrophotography? Follow these 10 tips to get the most out of your camera.

Backyard spectroscopy with RSpec • Try your hand at real-time science with your telescope.

A conversational guide to gravitational waves • RIPPLES IN SPACETIME: Einstein, Gravitational Waves, and the Future of Astronomy

Kepler CMOS: Paradigm Shift

Easy and effective light barrier • Block your neighbours’ annoying lights with these simple panels.

Star Stuff II brought out the stars • Another successful east coast gathering of amateur astronomers.

Astrophotos from our readers

Outwitted • How the...


Expand title description text
Frequency: Every other month Publisher: Paragon Media Pty Ltd Edition: Oct 01 2018

OverDrive Magazine

  • Release date: August 29, 2018

Formats

OverDrive Magazine

subjects

Science

Languages

English

Australian Sky & Telescope is a world-class magazine about the science and hobby of astronomy. Combining the formidable worldwide resources of its venerable parent magazine with the talents of the best science writers and photographers in Australia, Australian Sky & Telescope is

Always new things to learn

10 new moons for Jupiter

Organics inside Enceladus: complex enough for life?

Best long-range test of general relativity

Pulsar test limits the existence of a ‘fifth force’

Destroyed star feeds a black hole’s jet

A magnifying glass for a pulsar

Long-ago supervolcano created Mars rock formation

Hayabusa 2 arrives at asteroid Ryugu

IN BRIEF

The day the universe grew • Edwin Hubble’s observations showed us that the Milky Way is not all that there is.

SHADOW Science • As the Moon’s shadow crossed the Earth last year, researchers mounted intensive campaigns to study every aspect of the dramatic event.

Expanded roles for citizen scientists

Future Martian invasion?

Pioneer of a NEW astronomy • He’s largely forgotten, yet John Bolton founded a new type of science and probably should have been awarded the Nobel Prize.

To catch a falling star • Improve your chances of success by observing during an annual meteor shower.

The Moon Mess • A planet-scale smash created Earth’s satellite. But how did it come to be so like Earth?

Planets and Moons side by side • The Moon is the fifth-largest natural satellite in the Solar System, both in size and mass — even outranking Europa and Triton. In comparison with the giant planets that host the other large moons, though, Earth is puny. Worlds are shown to scale by radius. Sizes and mass ratios are rounded to the nearest 10.

`Oumuamua’s Dramatic visit • The space rock from beyond the Solar System has left us amazed and perplexed.

USING THE STAR CHART

A peek behind the curtain

The Sea Goat in the sky • The ancient constellation Capricornus has an interesting history.

An early evening blockbuster • Mercury, Venus, Mars, Jupiter and Saturn all share top billing this month.

Orionids by moonlight • The lunar glow will affect this month’s best meteor shower.

LUNAR PHENOMENA

SKY PHENOMENA

Voyage through the Telescope • Aptly named southern constellation is home to some pleasing doubles.

S Dor stars in the SMC • Two stellar targets in a challenging field.

Spring’s comet collection • There’s plenty of comet action in the southern sky during October.

A nod to lunar libration • Every month, the Moon’s face wobbles enough to give you a peek at some of its hidden farside.

Square galaxies • Spend some time hunting this group of faint fuzzies in the Great Square of Pegasus.

Giants walk among the stars • Uranus and Neptune are ideally placed for viewing in the evening sky.

Maroon Moon • The Moon turned red on the morning of July 28, as it slid into the Earth’s shadow for the longest lunar eclipse of the century.

Shoot the sky • Just getting started in astrophotography? Follow these 10 tips to get the most out of your camera.

Backyard spectroscopy with RSpec • Try your hand at real-time science with your telescope.

A conversational guide to gravitational waves • RIPPLES IN SPACETIME: Einstein, Gravitational Waves, and the Future of Astronomy

Kepler CMOS: Paradigm Shift

Easy and effective light barrier • Block your neighbours’ annoying lights with these simple panels.

Star Stuff II brought out the stars • Another successful east coast gathering of amateur astronomers.

Astrophotos from our readers

Outwitted • How the...


Expand title description text