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Science Illustrated

Issue 69
Magazine

Science Illustrated delivers natural science, break through discoveries and an understanding of the world for the entire family. Packed with stunning photography and in-depth editorial it’s a visually spectacular gateway to the world looking into the beginning of life to distant objects in the universe.

Science Illustrated Australia

Beaming up: Lasers used to sharpen stars

Dinner host: Caterpillar survives parasitic wasps

Remote power: NASA’s mini reactor for the Moon & Mars

The Milky Way’s life has been prolonged by 600 million years • Our galaxy will end its independent life when it collides with its large neighbour, the Andromeda galaxy – but this is now predicted to happen much later than astronomers had previously thought.

New treatment converts cancer into fat

BY THE WAY

Earth’s oldest stones were discovered on the Moon

Electric shocks – diet of the future? • By means of slight electric shocks, a new implant can fool your brain into believing that you are full, making it easier to lose weight.

Two human species shared the same cave

Mysterious object surprises astronomers

AROUND THE WORLD · Bolivia

Longer thicker brain-cell arms determine your IQ score

New method makes 3D printing 100 times faster • Scientists can now shape 3D figures at speed, using light frequencies to harden a liquid gel.

Fish virgin birth amazes scientists

AROUND THE WORLD · Peru

Vitamin D improves your memory

Implant controls the urge to pee • Scientists can correct a communication error between the urinary bladder and the brain which makes many people go to the bathroom more than is actually necessary.

Celtic soil bacterium may save lives

Satellites show the world becoming greener • Extensive tree planting projects and increased farmland have grown the world’s green areas by 5% since 2000.

AUSTRALIAN CAMERA FOR PHOTOGRAPHY ENTHUSIASTS

Do artificial sweeteners cause cancer?

Where does the energy from sunlight go? • If Earth receives energy from the Sun all the time, shouldn't our planet warm up? Where does the energy go?

Which has the greater surface area?

Can plants get cancer?

How does a blood glucose meter work?

How deep can the sand of a desert become?

Do insects have beaks? • Many insects have large jaws that protrude from their heads. Can these be classified as beaks?

What is the risk of being struck by an asteroid?

Luminous algae in the surf

…there is no upper temperature limit? • Absolute zero is the lowest limit of the thermodynamic temperature scale. But is there a similar upper limit for the temperature scale?

The hottest point in the universe is here on Earth

Why can some people make their eyes ‘shake’?

How can a bearded vulture feed on bones?

WHY DOES A FREEZER SEAL WHEN THE DOOR CLOSES?

How did Uluru become so large and so red? • Is Uluru a part of a mountain range that existed long ago? And what is the large rock made of that makes it red?

The giant meteor strike that humans (mostly) survived… • A meteor with a diameter of 1.5km strikes Greenland with the force of 700 nuclear bombs. The discovery of a huge crater reveals that this meteor strike may have delivered a millennium of cold temperatures for late Stone Age humans.

Crushed sand grains disclose strike • Radar waves gave scientists clues to find a huge crater. Slanting rock, gold, and cracked sand grains provided them with the final evidence of a tremendous meteor strike.

Meteor interrupted global defrosting • The ice age was about to end, and temperatures were approaching those of today. But then disaster struck. A huge meteor melted hundreds of cubic...


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Frequency: Every other month Pages: 84 Publisher: Nextmedia Pty Ltd Edition: Issue 69

OverDrive Magazine

  • Release date: August 14, 2019

Formats

OverDrive Magazine

subjects

Science

Languages

English

Science Illustrated delivers natural science, break through discoveries and an understanding of the world for the entire family. Packed with stunning photography and in-depth editorial it’s a visually spectacular gateway to the world looking into the beginning of life to distant objects in the universe.

Science Illustrated Australia

Beaming up: Lasers used to sharpen stars

Dinner host: Caterpillar survives parasitic wasps

Remote power: NASA’s mini reactor for the Moon & Mars

The Milky Way’s life has been prolonged by 600 million years • Our galaxy will end its independent life when it collides with its large neighbour, the Andromeda galaxy – but this is now predicted to happen much later than astronomers had previously thought.

New treatment converts cancer into fat

BY THE WAY

Earth’s oldest stones were discovered on the Moon

Electric shocks – diet of the future? • By means of slight electric shocks, a new implant can fool your brain into believing that you are full, making it easier to lose weight.

Two human species shared the same cave

Mysterious object surprises astronomers

AROUND THE WORLD · Bolivia

Longer thicker brain-cell arms determine your IQ score

New method makes 3D printing 100 times faster • Scientists can now shape 3D figures at speed, using light frequencies to harden a liquid gel.

Fish virgin birth amazes scientists

AROUND THE WORLD · Peru

Vitamin D improves your memory

Implant controls the urge to pee • Scientists can correct a communication error between the urinary bladder and the brain which makes many people go to the bathroom more than is actually necessary.

Celtic soil bacterium may save lives

Satellites show the world becoming greener • Extensive tree planting projects and increased farmland have grown the world’s green areas by 5% since 2000.

AUSTRALIAN CAMERA FOR PHOTOGRAPHY ENTHUSIASTS

Do artificial sweeteners cause cancer?

Where does the energy from sunlight go? • If Earth receives energy from the Sun all the time, shouldn't our planet warm up? Where does the energy go?

Which has the greater surface area?

Can plants get cancer?

How does a blood glucose meter work?

How deep can the sand of a desert become?

Do insects have beaks? • Many insects have large jaws that protrude from their heads. Can these be classified as beaks?

What is the risk of being struck by an asteroid?

Luminous algae in the surf

…there is no upper temperature limit? • Absolute zero is the lowest limit of the thermodynamic temperature scale. But is there a similar upper limit for the temperature scale?

The hottest point in the universe is here on Earth

Why can some people make their eyes ‘shake’?

How can a bearded vulture feed on bones?

WHY DOES A FREEZER SEAL WHEN THE DOOR CLOSES?

How did Uluru become so large and so red? • Is Uluru a part of a mountain range that existed long ago? And what is the large rock made of that makes it red?

The giant meteor strike that humans (mostly) survived… • A meteor with a diameter of 1.5km strikes Greenland with the force of 700 nuclear bombs. The discovery of a huge crater reveals that this meteor strike may have delivered a millennium of cold temperatures for late Stone Age humans.

Crushed sand grains disclose strike • Radar waves gave scientists clues to find a huge crater. Slanting rock, gold, and cracked sand grains provided them with the final evidence of a tremendous meteor strike.

Meteor interrupted global defrosting • The ice age was about to end, and temperatures were approaching those of today. But then disaster struck. A huge meteor melted hundreds of cubic...


Expand title description text