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Australian Sky & Telescope

May/June 2019
Magazine

Australian Sky & Telescope is a world-class magazine about the science and hobby of astronomy. Combining the formidable worldwide resources of its venerable parent magazine with the talents of the best science writers and photographers in Australia, Australian Sky & Telescope is

AstroQuest needs you!

AUSTRALIAN SKY & TELESCOPE

Lunar craters reveal recent impact history

Quasar ‘standard candles’ shed light on dark energy

Queensland’s Mount Kent Observatory expands

Impact spotted during lunar eclipse

Astronomers identify Jupiter weather cycle

‘The Cow’ puzzles astronomers

IN BRIEF

Saturn hasn’t always had rings

One small step for plantkind • With a germinating seed on the lunar farside, Earth’s biosphere makes a tentative foray into the cosmos.

JUNOCAM AT JUPITER: Where science meets art • Amateur processing has revealed this fantastic world from a unique perspective.

Alpha Centauri fever

NOT JUST A CENTAUR

THE PLANET THAT WASN’T

Spendthrift Spirals • The great spiral galaxies that adorn the modern universe are running out of gas and may someday lose their beautiful shapes.

ASTROQUEST: Unlocking the secrets of the universe • Scientists need your help with one the world’s biggest astrophysics projects.

Binary orbits explored • Follow the author on a celestial tour of some of his favourite binary pairs.

The Binary Tour

The Orbital Plots

Elusive giant

USING THE STAR CHART

Meadow in the sky • During the month of May, take a moment to marvel at open clusters, globular clusters and sparkling stars.

Jupiter at opposition • The king of the planets will dominate the evening sky.

Etas and sporadics • Plenty of meteor activity expected this autumn.

SKY PHENOMENA

LUNAR PHENOMENA

Close encounter of the comet kind • Remembering a tiny comet that slipped past Earth unobserved.

Teamwork through the ages • Since 1854, 420 amateurs have racked up 20,000 observations of S Virginis.

See Ceres at opposition • The biggest asteroid and brightest dwarf planet is at its best for 2019.

THE CASE OF THE EXOSPHERE

Eyeing Jupiter • Get the most out of your time observing the planetary king.

Shimmering clouds • Galactic cirrus is challenging to observe, but follow the author’s advice and treat yourself to a special experience.

Join the billion-light-year club • Photons that have travelled for billions of years instill a sense of awe.

The billion-light-year club

DEEP SKY DESTINATION • A 1.0-metre optical scope and 8.5-metre radio dish are the new star attractions at the Astronomical Society of Victoria’s rural observing site.

NURTURE YOUR NEWT II Collimation • Aligning your reflector’s mirrors — critical to getting the best view — is easier than you think.

Sony’s mirrorless marvel • We put a new Sony α7 III mirrorless camera through its paces on deep sky imaging.

A low-cost camera controller • This project is as easy as Pi.

2019 CALENDAR

Countdown to Apollo 11’s 50th • Lunar landing celebrations are about to blast off all over the world.

Anthony Wesley

Astrophotos from our readers

Why stargaze? • “Let me list the reasons,” an astronomer tells an inquiring young person.


Expand title description text
Frequency: Every other month Pages: 84 Publisher: Paragon Media Pty Ltd Edition: May/June 2019

OverDrive Magazine

  • Release date: April 10, 2019

Formats

OverDrive Magazine

subjects

Science

Languages

English

Australian Sky & Telescope is a world-class magazine about the science and hobby of astronomy. Combining the formidable worldwide resources of its venerable parent magazine with the talents of the best science writers and photographers in Australia, Australian Sky & Telescope is

AstroQuest needs you!

AUSTRALIAN SKY & TELESCOPE

Lunar craters reveal recent impact history

Quasar ‘standard candles’ shed light on dark energy

Queensland’s Mount Kent Observatory expands

Impact spotted during lunar eclipse

Astronomers identify Jupiter weather cycle

‘The Cow’ puzzles astronomers

IN BRIEF

Saturn hasn’t always had rings

One small step for plantkind • With a germinating seed on the lunar farside, Earth’s biosphere makes a tentative foray into the cosmos.

JUNOCAM AT JUPITER: Where science meets art • Amateur processing has revealed this fantastic world from a unique perspective.

Alpha Centauri fever

NOT JUST A CENTAUR

THE PLANET THAT WASN’T

Spendthrift Spirals • The great spiral galaxies that adorn the modern universe are running out of gas and may someday lose their beautiful shapes.

ASTROQUEST: Unlocking the secrets of the universe • Scientists need your help with one the world’s biggest astrophysics projects.

Binary orbits explored • Follow the author on a celestial tour of some of his favourite binary pairs.

The Binary Tour

The Orbital Plots

Elusive giant

USING THE STAR CHART

Meadow in the sky • During the month of May, take a moment to marvel at open clusters, globular clusters and sparkling stars.

Jupiter at opposition • The king of the planets will dominate the evening sky.

Etas and sporadics • Plenty of meteor activity expected this autumn.

SKY PHENOMENA

LUNAR PHENOMENA

Close encounter of the comet kind • Remembering a tiny comet that slipped past Earth unobserved.

Teamwork through the ages • Since 1854, 420 amateurs have racked up 20,000 observations of S Virginis.

See Ceres at opposition • The biggest asteroid and brightest dwarf planet is at its best for 2019.

THE CASE OF THE EXOSPHERE

Eyeing Jupiter • Get the most out of your time observing the planetary king.

Shimmering clouds • Galactic cirrus is challenging to observe, but follow the author’s advice and treat yourself to a special experience.

Join the billion-light-year club • Photons that have travelled for billions of years instill a sense of awe.

The billion-light-year club

DEEP SKY DESTINATION • A 1.0-metre optical scope and 8.5-metre radio dish are the new star attractions at the Astronomical Society of Victoria’s rural observing site.

NURTURE YOUR NEWT II Collimation • Aligning your reflector’s mirrors — critical to getting the best view — is easier than you think.

Sony’s mirrorless marvel • We put a new Sony α7 III mirrorless camera through its paces on deep sky imaging.

A low-cost camera controller • This project is as easy as Pi.

2019 CALENDAR

Countdown to Apollo 11’s 50th • Lunar landing celebrations are about to blast off all over the world.

Anthony Wesley

Astrophotos from our readers

Why stargaze? • “Let me list the reasons,” an astronomer tells an inquiring young person.


Expand title description text