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Australian Sky & Telescope

August/September 2019
Magazine

Australian Sky & Telescope is a world-class magazine about the science and hobby of astronomy. Combining the formidable worldwide resources of its venerable parent magazine with the talents of the best science writers and photographers in Australia, Australian Sky & Telescope is

Returning to that orb in the sky

Australian Sky & Telescope

Apollo-era data reveal the Moon’s tectonic activity

Omega Centauri is losing its stars

IN BRIEF

LIGO and Virgo find possible black hole–neutron star crash

Astronomers find Universe’s first type of molecule

Solar System ‘twin’ is missing infant Jupiters

IN BRIEF

Astronomers use asteroids to measure the stars

Prime position • We have astronomy to thank for our systems of timekeeping and navigation.

SKY celebration • Winning images from the ASNSW’s 2019 competition

We came in peace • Begun as Cold War race between the superpowers, the Apollo project came to symbolise our endless desire to explore.

Governing the Planets • This year marks the 400th anniversary of Kepler’s Third Law of Planetary Motion.

Living under a red sun • Life on worlds orbiting the smallest, most common stars would have to cope with environments vastly different to our own.

Your lunar travel guide • Kick-start your lunar observing with this easy guide to features on our neighbouring world.

Grab your tourist guide • Here are a few books and tools to make it easier to visit the Moon, our closest planetary companion.

USING THE STAR CHART

Living on the edge of the Rift

Celestial palette • We continue our exploration of colours in the sky.

Planets play hide and seek • Jupiter and Saturn rule the evening sky as Venus and Mars hide from view.

Cold nights, hot fireballs • The Southern Taurids start their rise in September.

SKY PHENOMENA

LUNAR PHENOMENA

Near-misses with the Sun • They don’t make sungrazing comets like these anymore.

The focus of attention • Professionals and amateurs are teaming up to study R Aquarii.

How old is that crater? • A new crater-dating technique yields new insights into what you see on the Moon.

The nebulae of Ophiuchus • Visit the Serpent Holder to snare a collection of dark and bright nebulae with just a few sweeps of your scope.

Saturn plays peek-a-boo with the Moon • Don’t miss these lunar occultations of the ringed planet.

Photo target: Luna • Taking images of the Moon can be as simple as you want it to be.

Red light field test • The author tested the effect of several colours of light and confirmed that the conventional wisdom of using red at night needs to be revisited.

BIG SCOPES for a big sky • SDM fans from around the world gathered in rural NSW to celebrate their aperture fever.

Lumicon’s new oxygen III filter • Lumicon improves a helpful visual accessory.

Can a planet think? • Because of one species — us — Earth’s biosphere has begun to resemble a human brain.

Frank’s four-mirror binoscopes • Tertiaries? Who needs tertiaries?

International imagery • A shortlist has been chosen for the ROG’s annual astrophoto competition.

2019 CALENDAR

Carol Redford

Astrophotos from our readers

HOW TO SUBMIT YOUR IMAGES

Next Issue ON SALE September 12

Blink and you’ll see it • The author’s serendipitous rediscovery of a Mira variable recalls the decidedly singular way the star was originally found.


Expand title description text
Frequency: Every other month Pages: 84 Publisher: Paragon Media Pty Ltd Edition: August/September 2019

OverDrive Magazine

  • Release date: July 10, 2019

Formats

OverDrive Magazine

subjects

Science

Languages

English

Australian Sky & Telescope is a world-class magazine about the science and hobby of astronomy. Combining the formidable worldwide resources of its venerable parent magazine with the talents of the best science writers and photographers in Australia, Australian Sky & Telescope is

Returning to that orb in the sky

Australian Sky & Telescope

Apollo-era data reveal the Moon’s tectonic activity

Omega Centauri is losing its stars

IN BRIEF

LIGO and Virgo find possible black hole–neutron star crash

Astronomers find Universe’s first type of molecule

Solar System ‘twin’ is missing infant Jupiters

IN BRIEF

Astronomers use asteroids to measure the stars

Prime position • We have astronomy to thank for our systems of timekeeping and navigation.

SKY celebration • Winning images from the ASNSW’s 2019 competition

We came in peace • Begun as Cold War race between the superpowers, the Apollo project came to symbolise our endless desire to explore.

Governing the Planets • This year marks the 400th anniversary of Kepler’s Third Law of Planetary Motion.

Living under a red sun • Life on worlds orbiting the smallest, most common stars would have to cope with environments vastly different to our own.

Your lunar travel guide • Kick-start your lunar observing with this easy guide to features on our neighbouring world.

Grab your tourist guide • Here are a few books and tools to make it easier to visit the Moon, our closest planetary companion.

USING THE STAR CHART

Living on the edge of the Rift

Celestial palette • We continue our exploration of colours in the sky.

Planets play hide and seek • Jupiter and Saturn rule the evening sky as Venus and Mars hide from view.

Cold nights, hot fireballs • The Southern Taurids start their rise in September.

SKY PHENOMENA

LUNAR PHENOMENA

Near-misses with the Sun • They don’t make sungrazing comets like these anymore.

The focus of attention • Professionals and amateurs are teaming up to study R Aquarii.

How old is that crater? • A new crater-dating technique yields new insights into what you see on the Moon.

The nebulae of Ophiuchus • Visit the Serpent Holder to snare a collection of dark and bright nebulae with just a few sweeps of your scope.

Saturn plays peek-a-boo with the Moon • Don’t miss these lunar occultations of the ringed planet.

Photo target: Luna • Taking images of the Moon can be as simple as you want it to be.

Red light field test • The author tested the effect of several colours of light and confirmed that the conventional wisdom of using red at night needs to be revisited.

BIG SCOPES for a big sky • SDM fans from around the world gathered in rural NSW to celebrate their aperture fever.

Lumicon’s new oxygen III filter • Lumicon improves a helpful visual accessory.

Can a planet think? • Because of one species — us — Earth’s biosphere has begun to resemble a human brain.

Frank’s four-mirror binoscopes • Tertiaries? Who needs tertiaries?

International imagery • A shortlist has been chosen for the ROG’s annual astrophoto competition.

2019 CALENDAR

Carol Redford

Astrophotos from our readers

HOW TO SUBMIT YOUR IMAGES

Next Issue ON SALE September 12

Blink and you’ll see it • The author’s serendipitous rediscovery of a Mira variable recalls the decidedly singular way the star was originally found.


Expand title description text