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Science Illustrated

Issue 71
Magazine

Science Illustrated delivers natural science, break through discoveries and an understanding of the world for the entire family. Packed with stunning photography and in-depth editorial it’s a visually spectacular gateway to the world looking into the beginning of life to distant objects in the universe.

Science Illustrated

Colour-coding a galaxy: stars, dust and supernovas

Mutual benefits: tarantula and frog live in harmony

Hole in atmosphere drains Mars of water • Warm summers and dust storms are responsible for the Red Planet losing its rivers and oceans.

Driverless cars to learn the meaning of fear

NEANDERTHALS HELD THEIR HEADS HIGH

Mysterious star reemerged from the dead

Shrimp builds diving bell of aluminium

Revealed! The secret defence of bacteria • New experiments reveal bacteria’s first defence against antibiotics. The discovery could lead to improved weapons against the microbes.

Earache? Check your smartphone • A new app and a paper cone quickly and easily reveal middle-ear inflammation.

Squishy robot survives drop of 180 metres

Why do leaves change colour before they fall? • Most leaves include different quantities of yellow, orange and red colours all year round, but we see them only when the dominant green hues disappear in the autumn.

WORST 5 • Which oil spill was the worst ever?

How do bird feathers look so colourful?

Is a black hole really a hole?

INSIDE THE BODY • Why do bruises change colour?

WHY DOES WATER TASTE COLDER AFTER A MINT?

How did the Milky Way get its spiral arms? • Last issue (p40-47) we described why scientists now believe that the ‘bump’ at the centre of our galaxy came first, not later as they had previously believed. But where did the spiral arms come from?

Are all electronics equally exposed in solar eruptions?

WHAT IS THIS? • Bluebottles are not one creature, but many

Can a pandemic spread globally in one week? • In the film Inferno, a lethal virus threatens to spread from a cistern in Istanbul to 95% of Earth's population in only one week. Could a pandemic really spread so fast?

WHO WROTE THE FIRST BOOKS ABOUT SCIENCE?

TOP 5 • What material is strongest compared to its weight?

How does the petrol pump know when your tank is full?

The latest construction workers are computerised: ROBOT TRADIES’ CONSTRUCTION REVOLUTION • A driverless excavator does the digging, a robotic arm lays 1000 bricks per hour. With new accurate sensors and smart algorithms, robots have built entire houses. In a few years, these robot tradies may be a common sight.

Driverless excavator excavates the foundations • The worker in the cabin has been replaced by a box of computers and sensors. Based on a 3D model of the building, the robot independently excavates the foundations highly accurately.

Robotic carpenter works according to colour codes

Robotic arm lays 1000 bricks per hour • The Australian robot Hadrian X builds walls at record speed. The robotic arm uses laser light for positioning and lays bricks made of lightweight concrete which are 12 times bigger than ordinary bricks and harden in 45 minutes.

Robotic arms calculate and assemble the roof structure • Robotic arms saw up timbers of the right sizes, place them accurately, drill holes in them, and fix the posts into a frame that will carry the roof of a house.

SCIENTISTS’ GREATEST WISHES FOR THE 2020s • Solar fuel, the elimination of malaria, and a theory about everything – we asked scientists what they would most like to see develop during the next decade.

PHYSICISTS' WISH LIST

Huge accelerator aims to confirm ultimate theory • Physicists would like a huge new accelerator which can...


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Frequency: Every other month Pages: 84 Publisher: Nextmedia Pty Ltd Edition: Issue 71

OverDrive Magazine

  • Release date: November 13, 2019

Formats

OverDrive Magazine

subjects

Science

Languages

English

Science Illustrated delivers natural science, break through discoveries and an understanding of the world for the entire family. Packed with stunning photography and in-depth editorial it’s a visually spectacular gateway to the world looking into the beginning of life to distant objects in the universe.

Science Illustrated

Colour-coding a galaxy: stars, dust and supernovas

Mutual benefits: tarantula and frog live in harmony

Hole in atmosphere drains Mars of water • Warm summers and dust storms are responsible for the Red Planet losing its rivers and oceans.

Driverless cars to learn the meaning of fear

NEANDERTHALS HELD THEIR HEADS HIGH

Mysterious star reemerged from the dead

Shrimp builds diving bell of aluminium

Revealed! The secret defence of bacteria • New experiments reveal bacteria’s first defence against antibiotics. The discovery could lead to improved weapons against the microbes.

Earache? Check your smartphone • A new app and a paper cone quickly and easily reveal middle-ear inflammation.

Squishy robot survives drop of 180 metres

Why do leaves change colour before they fall? • Most leaves include different quantities of yellow, orange and red colours all year round, but we see them only when the dominant green hues disappear in the autumn.

WORST 5 • Which oil spill was the worst ever?

How do bird feathers look so colourful?

Is a black hole really a hole?

INSIDE THE BODY • Why do bruises change colour?

WHY DOES WATER TASTE COLDER AFTER A MINT?

How did the Milky Way get its spiral arms? • Last issue (p40-47) we described why scientists now believe that the ‘bump’ at the centre of our galaxy came first, not later as they had previously believed. But where did the spiral arms come from?

Are all electronics equally exposed in solar eruptions?

WHAT IS THIS? • Bluebottles are not one creature, but many

Can a pandemic spread globally in one week? • In the film Inferno, a lethal virus threatens to spread from a cistern in Istanbul to 95% of Earth's population in only one week. Could a pandemic really spread so fast?

WHO WROTE THE FIRST BOOKS ABOUT SCIENCE?

TOP 5 • What material is strongest compared to its weight?

How does the petrol pump know when your tank is full?

The latest construction workers are computerised: ROBOT TRADIES’ CONSTRUCTION REVOLUTION • A driverless excavator does the digging, a robotic arm lays 1000 bricks per hour. With new accurate sensors and smart algorithms, robots have built entire houses. In a few years, these robot tradies may be a common sight.

Driverless excavator excavates the foundations • The worker in the cabin has been replaced by a box of computers and sensors. Based on a 3D model of the building, the robot independently excavates the foundations highly accurately.

Robotic carpenter works according to colour codes

Robotic arm lays 1000 bricks per hour • The Australian robot Hadrian X builds walls at record speed. The robotic arm uses laser light for positioning and lays bricks made of lightweight concrete which are 12 times bigger than ordinary bricks and harden in 45 minutes.

Robotic arms calculate and assemble the roof structure • Robotic arms saw up timbers of the right sizes, place them accurately, drill holes in them, and fix the posts into a frame that will carry the roof of a house.

SCIENTISTS’ GREATEST WISHES FOR THE 2020s • Solar fuel, the elimination of malaria, and a theory about everything – we asked scientists what they would most like to see develop during the next decade.

PHYSICISTS' WISH LIST

Huge accelerator aims to confirm ultimate theory • Physicists would like a huge new accelerator which can...


Expand title description text